The Binary Borgnine Horizon Theory

How do I remember that the HTML named entity for an ellipsis is … and not &ellip;? Because if it were ellip, for ellipsis, I wouldn’t be wondering in the first place about whether or not there’s an “h” in there. (It’s a horizontal ellipsis.) (There’s also a vertical ellipsis numbered entity.) Though the exact definition of the Binary Borgnine Horizon Theory is as hazy as its silly name (which I am at full liberty to come up with) it’s basically that you should look for ways to reduce in two steps — first to a binary, then between the two. That there’s a good number of these easy-level Sudoku puzzles sitting around in life.

Argentina and Venezuela are another example. How do I remember that Venezuela is at the top of South America and Argentina is at the bottom of South America? I happen to have noticed once, in elementary school, that they started with letters at opposite ends of the alphabet. Only I found it a shame that the letters were switched around in order, because I needed to remember it as A to V. Top to bottom — the Western text direction other than left-to-right. Then I realized that, because I happen to know that they’re switched around, it can only be the one way. In other words, because I already knew about that first letter thing, I had a binary. Understanding that there was an extra step involved meant that it couldn’t be the original way. It filled in two more countries in my image of South America, and I could avoid learning by rote.

The Borgnine Horizon, by the way, is the point beyond which all is Ernest Borgnine. There’s no actual idea attached to that.

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